Daily Archives: May 7, 2013

Satyamev Jayate – Toxic Food – Poison On Our Plate

OFAI (Organic Farming Association of India) : Organic Farming in INDIA

Organic farming in India is the form of agriculture that relies on techniques such as crop rotation, green manure, compost and biological pest control. Organic farming is done using only natural and organic materials. It relies on ecological processes, biodiversity and cycles adapted to local conditions, rather than the use of inputs with adverse effects. Increasing environmental awareness in the general population has transformed the originally supply-driven movement to a demand-driven one. Most of the western countries import coco peat blocs from India.

OFAI was set up by the Indian organic farming community, environmentalists and social activists in order to promote organic farming, lobby for its official adoption by the Indian government, assist farmers dependent on chemicals to convert to organic systems, help organic farmers with marketing their organic produce and advise its members on how to educate their children outside the urban-oriented school system so that they could be excellent stewards of the lands they inherit.

Advantages of using organic foods

  • Health: Organic foods are produced without the use of pesticides that could cause serious illnesses
  • Good for the animals: People who eat organic are happy to know the animals are not confined to a caged life, pumped full of hormones, or treated badly.
  • Environmental Safety: Harmful chemicals are not used in organic farming, and there is minimal soil, air, and water pollution being produced. Also, many organic farmers donate/support causes to help save the planet.
  • Better taste: Most people strongly believe organic foods taste better than non-organic foods. This could be because they are much fresher.

Many people are realizing the benefits of eating organic and are trying to do their part by buying all of their foods organic.

Top 10 green pilgrims of India

[1] Golden Temple of Sripuram is a spiritual park situated at the foothills of Malaikodi, a village within the city of Vellore in Tamil Nadu, India. Sripuram received “Exnora Green Temple Award” and “Exnora Best Eco-friendly Campus of India Award”

Green-o-Meter : The eco-friendly features include Solid Waste Management (SWM), Liquid Waste Management (LWM), rainwater harvesting, bio-gas generation, organic farming, herbal gardens, paddy fields and tree plantations, hill and campus afforestation and harnessing of solar energy. Manure and water for cultivation are generated internally.

[2] The Tirumala temple, in the south Indian city of Tirupathi, is one of Hinduism’s holiest shrines. Over 5,000 pilgrims a day visit this city of seven hills, filling Tirumala’s coffers with donations and making it India’s richest temple. But since 2002, Tirumala has also been generating revenue from a less likely source: carbon credits. For decades, the temple’s community kitchen has fed nearly 15,000 people, cooking 30,000 meals a day. Five years ago, Tirumala adopted solar cooking technology, allowing it to dramatically cut down on the amount of diesel fuel it uses. The temple now sells the emission reduction credits it earns to a Swiss green-technology investor, Good Energies Inc.

Green-o-Meter : use of Solar Cooking System

[3] Muni Seva Ashram, in Gujarat, which combines spiritual practice with social activism, is working to make its premises entirely green by using solar, wind and biogas energy. A residential school for 400 students is already running exclusively on green energy. Starting this year, the ashram will also sell three million carbon credits.

Green-o-Meter : use of Solar Energy Power, Wind Energy and Biogas Plant.

[4] Shirdi Sai Baba Temple, The Sai Baba temple in Maharashtra’s Shirdi town has gone green as ‘prasadam’in the temple kitchens are prepared through solar-steam cooking system for thousands of devotees. Our effort has always been to be considerate about the environment. We use 30 percent of solar energy used in India. We have built our own infrastructure to harness both solar energy and wind energy.

Green-o-Meter : use of Solar Steam Cooking System and Wind Energy.

[5] ISKCON, in Tirumala, Andhra Pradesh, Surrounded by seven hills, high above lush green forests is the temple town of Tirumala. The crown jewel is the dazzling gold-plated temple of Lord Venkateshwara. Inside the temple complex, a large multi-storey building is dedicated to just one thing – cooking free meals for pilgrims. Several cooks work in tandem stirring large pots of rice, curry and vegetables. Nearly 50,000 kilos of rice along with lentils are cooked here every day. Open all day, this community kitchen is the biggest green project for the temple. Located on the roof of this building are rows of solar dishes that automatically move with the angle of the sun, capturing the strong sunlight. Generating over 4,000kgs of steam a day at 180º C, this makes the cooking faster and cheaper. As a result, an average of 500 litres of diesel fuel is saved each day.

Green-o-Meter : use of Solar Steam Cooking System, Reserve Forest Development (a-forestation).

 

 

[6] Ambaji Temple, Gujarat, The administration has decided to give Ambaji a clean makeover as well as make it eco-friendly. Proper disposal of garbage, underground gutters, LPG connections, massive tree plantation and raising the check dams on the Teliya river, are some of the steps planned in this direction.

Green-o-Meter : use of Waste Management, Tree Plantation (a-forestation), Solar Steam Cooking System,

[7] The Golden Temple in Amritsar, India is making efforts to reduce their carbon footprint. About 100,000 pilgrims and tourists visit Amritsar each day. A few major holy cities have made an environmental group called, The Green Pilgrimage Network, they help to make religious travelers to be more environmental friendly. They want to reduce the carbon footprint to set a good example and also because they use many resources for all the people that visit all the time so it would make a big difference to change the temple. Around 85,000 meals are served a day and they are served on stainless steel plates so no plastic waste. They are planning to use solar panels for the lighting and solar water heaters. Also, they want to start harvesting rainwater. The temple speakers remind earth friendly messages to the pilgrims to hope it sticks to them and spreads.

Green-o-Meter : use of Solar Cooking System, Solar energy for cooking, lighting and cooling.

[8] Jama Masjid, Delhi, Dedicated buildings have been built at the holy places to cook meals for devotees using solar energy. Turning to renewable energy has dramatically cut down the cooking gas and diesel costs and provides uninterrupted electricity. Moreover, the solar cooking is clean, hygienic and efficient, especially when large quantities need to be cooked.

Green-o-Meter : use of Solar Energy for lighting and cooling.

[9] Lotus Temple of Bahai, Delhi, Dedicated buildings have been built at the holy places to cook meals for devotees using solar energy. Turning to renewable energy has dramatically cut down the cooking gas and diesel costs and provides uninterrupted electricity. Moreover, the solar cooking is clean, hygienic and efficient, especially when large quantities need to be cooked.

Green-o-Meter : use of Solar Energy for lighting and cooling.

[10] Jagannath Temple, Puri, Odisha, Dedicated buildings have been built at the holy places to cook meals for devotees using solar energy. Turning to renewable energy has dramatically cut down the cooking gas and diesel costs and provides uninterrupted electricity. Moreover, the solar cooking is clean, hygienic and efficient, especially when large quantities need to be cooked.

Green-o-Meter : use of Solar Power for lighting.

 

GreenVichar Quotes

Our Team-work in office, on earth day. Re-use Plastic Bottles

Our Team at work on Earth Day Celebration 22nd April 2013.

Re-use of plastic bottles as magazine holder. Really Innovative and green step towards a clean and green world.

Benefits of Peepal Tree

This tree of life has also got the medicinal value. The juice of its leaves extracted by holding them near the fire can be used as the ear drop. Its power bark has been used to heal the wounds for years. The bark of the tree is useful in inflammations and glandular swelling of the neck. Its root bark is useful for stomatitis, clean ulcers, and promotes granulations. Its roots are also good for gout. The roots are even chewed to prevent gum diseases. Its fruit is laxative which promotes digestion and checks vomiting. Its ripe fruits are good for the foul taste, thirst and heart diseases. The powered fruit is taken for Asthma. Its seeds have proved useful in urinary troubles. The leaves are used to treat constipation.

Controls diabetes: In India, diabetes is a disease of serious concern because of the fact that increasingly many people are being diagnosed of this disease. Studies are shedding light on the possible use of peepal extracts in diabetes. Diabetes induced rats showed a significant drop in the blood glucose levels after being administered with peepal extracts. Apart from glucose levels, even cholesterol levels had also been controlled.
Anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties: The leaf extracts of peepal contain anti-inflammatory as well as analgesic properties which are effective in controlling rheumatic pains and arthritis.
Anti-convulsant properties: Studies on peepal fruit extracts indicate that they possess convulsion preventive properties. This was tested on lab rats which were given electric shocks along with picrotoxin and pentylenetetrazol chemicals. Final results showed that peepal fruit extracts had reduced convulsions resulting from the electrical shocks and chemicals. The extracts were also helpful in inducing deep sleep on the subjects.
Anti-microbial properties: The leaf extracts of Peepal were studied for their anti-microbial properties. Studies showed control of various bacteria and fungi such as Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger.
Wound healing properties: The leaf extracts of Peepal showed wound healing properties. Wounds like excision and incision wounds healed faster when test subjects were given the leaf extracts compared to test subjects which were not given any medicine.
Helpful in amnesia: In behaviour controlled environments for amnesia induced rats, fig extracts of peepal were investigated for their possible role in improving the memory of the subjects. Results showed significant improvement in rats which were given fig extracts, suggesting a positive relationship between amnesia control and peepal figs.

PEEPAL TREE -(a.k.a)- Ficus religiosa

The sacred Peepal Tree also known as Ficus religiosa.

The peepal is used extensively in Ayurveda. Its bark yields the tannin used in treating leather. Its leaves, when heated in ghee, are applied to cure wounds. Peepal or Ashwatha tree is of great importance in Ayurveda. It is believed to cure diseases such as gonorrhoea, haemorrhoids, diarrhoea, dysentery, gastrohelcosis, neuralgia and inflammations. Peepal tree is of religious importance also in India.

Some believe that the tree houses the Trimurti, the roots being Brahma, the trunk Vishnu and the leaves Shiva. The gods are said to hold their councils under this tree and so it is associated with spiritual understanding. The Peepal is also closely linked to Krishna. In the Bhagavad Gita, he says: “Among trees, I am the ashvattha.” Krishna is believed to have died under this tree, after which the present Kaliyuga is said to have begun.

The Peepal originates from India and is found in the most unlikely of places. In Nepal, travellers will rest under the Peepal to regain energy. In India, Hindus and Buddhists consider it a holy and sacred tree. If you do your qi gong or your yoga meditation under a Peepal, the benefits double or triple due to its strong energy.